Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—smartphones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video. It also must be able to let you work with 4K video, since common devices are now capable of producing 4K content.
The app allows you to transfer your projects to Screencast and edit them there. You will need an account for that on top of your Camtasia account. Both platforms provide free trials and subscriptions. Before upgrading, all your content will have a watermark in it. The label is hardly visible, so that won’t be much of an issue if you just want to enjoy the free software. However, if you’re going to attempt to do more professional work, you’ll want to spring for the upgrade and get the watermark removed.
Openshot is entirely open source, which makes it one of the best video editing software that is accessible. It may remind some Mac users a little of iMovie with its easy to use drag and drop interface. However, Openshot packs more features than iMovie, including unlimited layers and audio mixing. This free editor strikes a nice balance between advanced features and a simple interface. It also allows real-time previews when you create transitions between clips.
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. Final Cut also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more-traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features, and of course plays well with Ancillary Adobe software such as After Effects and Photoshop.
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
Horizon is a simple app that enables users to capture videos horizontally no matter the position of their phone. When we rush to capture a moment we may forget to tilt the phone and capture the action horizontally. This app can help you solve that problem: all footage shot in the app is captured horizontally no matter how you tilt your phone. Check out this demo to see how it works. Avoid vertically captured videos and shoot quick videos in the Horizon app.
Clicking the big plus button on web or in the iOS app will open a slide-based editor. No complicated timelines here with Spark's intro video maker! We suggest storyboarding out your animated video story within the app by selecting one of the preloaded story structures or creating your own by adding notes to slides, which will guide your creation. Each slide should represent just one point or thought.
Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—smartphones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video. It also must be able to let you work with 4K video, since common devices are now capable of producing 4K content.
Anchor Video Maker, available on iOS and Android, is great for making audio content much more engaging. Don’t let those audio files go to waste: awesome videos can also start life as soundbites. This app automatically transcribes your audio files or podcasts into Instagram friendly videos. Check out this article, for a demo, tutorial, and download links.

Last but not least we come to FilmoraGo. FilmoraGo is a solid video editing app without any watermarks or paid subscriptions. Add music, transitions, and trim video clips all from within the app. You can easily add themes, text, and titles to your videos. There is a desktop version starting at $44.99 a year, but you can still get a lot of editing joy from the free mobile app.
When you’re doing a tutorial or game session, and you want the audience to see your expressions, CS can help with that. Use the picture-in-picture mode to create a video showing your instructions on screen. Another cool thing when using this is that Camtasia can split the recorded file into two separate tracks. One for your talking head and one is the actual content. You can edit each of them as an entire project.
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