Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, and pro software already supports up to 8K, which isn't useful unless you have a full-size movie theater. The support for 4K formats varies among the consumer products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.


DaVinci Resolve is arguably the most advanced video editor on the list. While it has many professional video features, its interfaces remain intuitive. Alongside video slicing and trimming you can master audio and correct color. You can also use it to add 2D and 3D titles to your video. If you just want to trim and upload your videos, the rich feature set of DaVinci Resolve may be too extensive. However, if your video project is a little more advanced, the free version of this software is hard to beat.

Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a feature update.
LOTS of errors. I know it's good software, and I would definitely recommend it, it has too many errors. Just today I tried to record my webcam, and got "An unexpected error has occurred. Capture cannot be started". I have searched for answers and typically could not find any. Sometimes when I edit clips they crash the software and then I lose sometimes hours of hard work.
The good thing about Camtasia is that the free version contains every function of the original one. So, you can try all the game-changing features such as the overlapping media. It’s an inherent mechanic that lets you combine multiple clips into one video. Other programs, such as OBS Studio or Filmora Video Editor, can do the same thing, but not as easily as CS.
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
Camtasia is a software that lets you create videos of your computer screen or webcam feed in real time. You can choose between recording your entire screen or define just a portion of it to be captured. In addition to producing high-quality video, the software lets you edit your videos once they are recorded. The editing feature includes many advanced options, including video superimposing, brightness adjusting, and video syncing as well as the ability to apply visual effects, such as blur or green screen. Once you've finished editing your video project, you can share it on sites like YouTube, Google, or the hosting site Screencast.
Finishing tools: Once you have your screen capture recording the way you want it, you can utilize the various tools included in the program to make your video complete. These include multiple Transition Options, Voice Narration, a Zoom and Pan effect, Cursor Effects, Captions, Quizzing, and more. You can also use built-in tools to enhance and improve the audio quality of your voice recording.
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