In terms of usability, Camtasia should be among the top choices due to how beginner-friendly it is. But, also due to its simplicity, not too many professional creators will find Camtasia Studio appealing. If you’re only starting to learn the basics of video editing, this app is perfect for that. It’s got a nice interface, intuitive controls, and useful tutorials. Those are everything you need for an easy beginning. 

Clicking the big plus button on web or in the iOS app will open Spark's video editor for YouTube. No complicated timelines here! We suggest storyboarding out your video story within the app by selecting one of the preloaded story structures or creating your own by adding notes to slides, which will guide your creation. Each slide should represent just one point or thought.
Wasn't responsing when editing, constant freezing and crashing. Weakly made version update. Won't let add mp3s into library, mp3 codec & flac codec missing. Weakly made program (editing program is not supposed to freeze everytime after editing timeline. Timeline is not updating real time while editing. HD presets are not really HD and you have to make your own preset modifications. Program makers probably never heard of good quality. Won't allow making own moving text scripts. (After effects cc).
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360($189.00 at Amazon) as a current home-theater fad, and to be honest, it's light is starting to fade. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. Final Cut also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more-traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features, and of course plays well with Ancillary Adobe software such as After Effects and Photoshop.
Good old iMovie comes baked into Mac OS. Like most native Mac apps, this video editor is very intuitive to use. It features a drag and drop interface. Mac users can use iMovie as a playground for learning the basics of video editing. Once you are up to speed, you may find that alternative video editing software in this list may better suit your needs.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a feature update.

The good thing about Camtasia is that the free version contains every function of the original one. So, you can try all the game-changing features such as the overlapping media. It’s an inherent mechanic that lets you combine multiple clips into one video. Other programs, such as OBS Studio or Filmora Video Editor, can do the same thing, but not as easily as CS.
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