Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, and pro software already supports up to 8K, which isn't useful unless you have a full-size movie theater. The support for 4K formats varies among the consumer products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360($189.00 at Amazon) as a current home-theater fad, and to be honest, it's light is starting to fade. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.
LOTS of errors. I know it's good software, and I would definitely recommend it, it has too many errors. Just today I tried to record my webcam, and got "An unexpected error has occurred. Capture cannot be started". I have searched for answers and typically could not find any. Sometimes when I edit clips they crash the software and then I lose sometimes hours of hard work.
Clicking the big plus button on web or in the iOS app will open a slide-based editor. No complicated timelines here with Spark's intro video maker! We suggest storyboarding out your animated video story within the app by selecting one of the preloaded story structures or creating your own by adding notes to slides, which will guide your creation. Each slide should represent just one point or thought.
Clicking the big plus button on web or in the iOS app will open Spark's video editor for YouTube. No complicated timelines here! We suggest storyboarding out your video story within the app by selecting one of the preloaded story structures or creating your own by adding notes to slides, which will guide your creation. Each slide should represent just one point or thought.
Another impressive effect that has made its way into consumer-level video editing software is motion tracking, which lets you attach an object or effect to something moving in your video. You might use it to place a blur over the face of someone you don't want revealed in your video, or to display a text box next to a moving object. You mark the object you want to track, specify the effect or text, and the app takes care of the rest, following the marked object. This used to be the sole province of special-effects software such as Adobe After Effects. Corel VideoStudio was the first of the consumer products to include motion tracking, and it still leads the pack in the depth and usability of its motion-tracking tool, though several others now include the capability.

One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is more-detailed color grading. Color wheels, curves, and histograms give editors control over the intensity of every shade. Related to this is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.
Horizon is a simple app that enables users to capture videos horizontally no matter the position of their phone. When we rush to capture a moment we may forget to tilt the phone and capture the action horizontally. This app can help you solve that problem: all footage shot in the app is captured horizontally no matter how you tilt your phone. Check out this demo to see how it works. Avoid vertically captured videos and shoot quick videos in the Horizon app.
This slick video editing tool is great for marketers, publishers, individuals and agencies alike. With support for video stabilization, team collaboration, and much more this software is best in class for many different reasons. Users praise this video editing software for it’s amazing customer service, UX, value for money, and of course it’s features. 

The app allows you to transfer your projects to Screencast and edit them there. You will need an account for that on top of your Camtasia account. Both platforms provide free trials and subscriptions. Before upgrading, all your content will have a watermark in it. The label is hardly visible, so that won’t be much of an issue if you just want to enjoy the free software. However, if you’re going to attempt to do more professional work, you’ll want to spring for the upgrade and get the watermark removed.
I've been seeing a lot of attention paid to creating title effects in the applications over the past year. Apple Final Cut Pro X has added 3D title creation, which is pretty spiffy, letting you extrude 2D titles and rotate them on three axes. Corel VideoStudio in its latest version also adds 3D Titling, though not as powerful as Apple's. PowerDirector's Title Designer offers transparency, gradient color, border, blur level, and reflection in titles; Magix has impressive title templates, complete with animations. Premiere Elements offers a nifty title effect in which your video fills the text characters, and Corel followed suit with a similar tool in VideoStudio. Look for an application that lets you edit titles in WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) mode, so that you can type, format, and time it right over the video preview.
Openshot is entirely open source, which makes it one of the best video editing software that is accessible. It may remind some Mac users a little of iMovie with its easy to use drag and drop interface. However, Openshot packs more features than iMovie, including unlimited layers and audio mixing. This free editor strikes a nice balance between advanced features and a simple interface. It also allows real-time previews when you create transitions between clips.
When you’re doing a tutorial or game session, and you want the audience to see your expressions, CS can help with that. Use the picture-in-picture mode to create a video showing your instructions on screen. Another cool thing when using this is that Camtasia can split the recorded file into two separate tracks. One for your talking head and one is the actual content. You can edit each of them as an entire project.
×