There are more video editing software applications than we can fit into this roundup of the best options, which includes only software rated three stars and higher. The best known among them is probably Vegas Movie Studio, which was acquired by Magix from Sony. Sony's product used a very cluttered interface that more resembled high-end professional video editing software from the early days of the craft. Magix has made some progress in simplifying it and bringing it up to par with the competition, but more work is needed for it to be included here.
Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That includes things like multitrack editing, motion tracking, and advanced color grading. This trend is a boon to nonprofessional movie editors, since the more consumer-oriented software tends to simplify procedures that can be complex in the pro-level software. It also means you'll have more familiarity, should you move up to a professional application.
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360($189.00 at Amazon) as a current home-theater fad, and to be honest, it's light is starting to fade. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.

The good thing about Camtasia is that the free version contains every function of the original one. So, you can try all the game-changing features such as the overlapping media. It’s an inherent mechanic that lets you combine multiple clips into one video. Other programs, such as OBS Studio or Filmora Video Editor, can do the same thing, but not as easily as CS.


In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. Final Cut also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more-traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features, and of course plays well with Ancillary Adobe software such as After Effects and Photoshop.
ZS4 Video Editor is another video editor for Mac just like Avidemux. It's an open source software create by combined efforts of many users like you. It was first published in 2012 as a beta project. Today, ZS4 Video Editor is best known for taking into consideration the basic needs of an average MacBook user and streamline it to fit those requirements.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
Finishing tools: Once you have your screen capture recording the way you want it, you can utilize the various tools included in the program to make your video complete. These include multiple Transition Options, Voice Narration, a Zoom and Pan effect, Cursor Effects, Captions, Quizzing, and more. You can also use built-in tools to enhance and improve the audio quality of your voice recording.
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