Another impressive effect that has made its way into consumer-level video editing software is motion tracking, which lets you attach an object or effect to something moving in your video. You might use it to place a blur over the face of someone you don't want revealed in your video, or to display a text box next to a moving object. You mark the object you want to track, specify the effect or text, and the app takes care of the rest, following the marked object. This used to be the sole province of special-effects software such as Adobe After Effects. Corel VideoStudio was the first of the consumer products to include motion tracking, and it still leads the pack in the depth and usability of its motion-tracking tool, though several others now include the capability.


Good old iMovie comes baked into Mac OS. Like most native Mac apps, this video editor is very intuitive to use. It features a drag and drop interface. Mac users can use iMovie as a playground for learning the basics of video editing. Once you are up to speed, you may find that alternative video editing software in this list may better suit your needs.
Whether you want to create a YouTube movie or just a simple reaction video for Youtube, your video is saved to your Spark project organizer so that you can edit it at any time. Change themes, music, images or text, and add or delete slides as needed. Also, Spark Post is perfect for creating a unique YouTube thumbnail for your video as well. For tips and design advice, visit Spark’s blog and tutorials, or browse the inspiration gallery for ideas.
Camtasia is a software that lets you create videos of your computer screen or webcam feed in real time. You can choose between recording your entire screen or define just a portion of it to be captured. In addition to producing high-quality video, the software lets you edit your videos once they are recorded. The editing feature includes many advanced options, including video superimposing, brightness adjusting, and video syncing as well as the ability to apply visual effects, such as blur or green screen. Once you've finished editing your video project, you can share it on sites like YouTube, Google, or the hosting site Screencast.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is more-detailed color grading. Color wheels, curves, and histograms give editors control over the intensity of every shade. Related to this is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.

In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. Final Cut also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more-traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features, and of course plays well with Ancillary Adobe software such as After Effects and Photoshop.
For whatever reason you wish to produce a video for, Camtasia Studio makes it easy to impress your audience. It's a powerful and intuitive editing suite that's subscription free. With impressive little add-ons such as a green screen to throw yourself into the action on screen, it's a very useful tool, packed with great features, for amateurs and advanced users alike.
Though university I graduated from (and one my daughter currently attends) have limited academic licenses available, I chose to purchase an indvidual pro license that I could use for my personal and professional use in 2011. I am glad I did! At the time I purchased Camtasia Studio 7 (CS7), but at a time when Camtasia Studio 8 was being previewed and was a no cost upgrade. There have been some growing pains with Camtasia Studio 8 (CS8), but the current 8.2 release seems to have stabilized and all major features I seek now have more function and are as fast or faster to render as the old reliable CS7.
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