TechSmith launched a web show in August 2010. Common topics of conversation include screen capture, screencasting, various tools and techniques. There are normally guests either over Skype or in person. The first guest was Jon Udell, a Microsoft Evangelist and long-time screencaster who helped come up with the term screencasting.[14] The Forge is hosted on YouTube as well as TechSmith's Visual Lounge (blog site). Matt Pierce hosts the show. The format normally consists of interviews, promotions, and product reviews. Videos created from other users are sometimes featured on the show as well.[15]

Coach’s Eye is a mobile app for the iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and many Android devices that enables users to capture, analyze and share video. It is designed with the intent that coaches and parents can record athletes, analyze the playback and share it with others. It enables an instructor to shoot video of an athlete's swing, throw, kick, etc. and then add voice instructions and illustrate the video with simple annotations. Coaches and athletes view the video in slow motion or scrub through the video using the on-screen flywheel, showing precisely what points need to be shown. The finished videos can be uploaded to sharing sites like YouTube, emailed or sent via MMS, giving the instructor several outlets for sharing with athletes or other coaches. It was launched November, 2011.
Though university I graduated from (and one my daughter currently attends) have limited academic licenses available, I chose to purchase an indvidual pro license that I could use for my personal and professional use in 2011. I am glad I did! At the time I purchased Camtasia Studio 7 (CS7), but at a time when Camtasia Studio 8 was being previewed and was a no cost upgrade. There have been some growing pains with Camtasia Studio 8 (CS8), but the current 8.2 release seems to have stabilized and all major features I seek now have more function and are as fast or faster to render as the old reliable CS7.
From your iOS mobile or web app, click the plus button in Adobe Spark, then select video to launch a new project in the video editor. Title your video to get started—don’t worry, it’s easy to change the title later—then dive into the video editing fun. You can watch the brief tutorial on how to edit videos or skip straight to adding your own content to slides.
In Camtasia Recorder, the presenter can start and stop recording with a hotkey combination at any time, at which point the recording can be halted and Camtasia Recorder can render the input that has been captured into a CAMREC format. The CAMREC file can be saved to disk or directly imported into the Camtasia component for editing. Camtasia Recorder allows audio recording while screen-capturing is in progress, so the presenter can capture live narration during a demonstration or presentation. Camtasia also supports dubbing in other audio tracks or voiceover during post-capture editing. Users may also download an add-in for Microsoft Power Point that will allow them to initiate recording of a presentation from within Power Point itself.
Though university I graduated from (and one my daughter currently attends) have limited academic licenses available, I chose to purchase an indvidual pro license that I could use for my personal and professional use in 2011. I am glad I did! At the time I purchased Camtasia Studio 7 (CS7), but at a time when Camtasia Studio 8 was being previewed and was a no cost upgrade. There have been some growing pains with Camtasia Studio 8 (CS8), but the current 8.2 release seems to have stabilized and all major features I seek now have more function and are as fast or faster to render as the old reliable CS7.
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